What is Oakland’s Measure Y? A video explainer by Tony Daquipa and Ashley McBride

Measure Y is one of four Oakland ballot measures in this year’s election. If it passes, The Oakland Unified School District will receive a $735 million bond to fix up its school campuses.

Earlier this year, the school board approved a project list — it includes upgrades for certain campuses, and improvements across the district for things like technology, energy efficiency, and classrooms.

In April, OUSD published a 400-page report detailing their facility needs. In total, the plan identified $1.3 billion dollars in upgrades across the district.

Because there’s a limit to how much OUSD can ask for in this bond, board members had to whittle that list down to projects that add up to $735 million. 

Reporting by Oakland Voices correspondent Tony Daquipa and The Oaklandside’s Ashley McBride. Videos shot and edited by Lauren Richardson and produced by Momo Chang (Oakland Voices) and Jacob Simas (The Oaklandside). Video features Daquipa, McBride, and Oakland Voices correspondent Howard Dyckoff.

Oakland Voices and The Oaklandside co-reported and produced video explainers about Oakland’s four 2020 ballot measures.

TRANSCRIPT:

Ashley McBride: Hi, my name is Ashley McBride and I cover education equity at The Oaklandside.

Tony Daquipa: And I’m Tony Daquipa from Oakland Voices. We’re going to talk about Measure Y today. Ashley, what is Measure Y?

AM: Measure Y is one of four measures on the Oakland ballot this year. If it passes, The Oakland Unified School District will receive a $735 million bond to fix up its school campuses.

TD: That’s a lot of money. Do we know what it would be spent on?

AM: We do. Earlier this year, the school board approved a project list — it includes upgrades for certain campuses, and improvements across the district for things like technology, energy efficiency, and classrooms.

TD: Does OUSD really need all these upgrades?

AM: Well, according to the district, they need even more. In April, OUSD published a 400-page report detailing their facility needs. In total, the plan identified $1.3 billion dollars in upgrades across the district. Because there’s a limit to how much OUSD can ask for in this bond, board members had to whittle that list down to projects that add up to $735 million. Tony, you spoke with some Oakland voters—what are people saying about this bond measure?

TD: Well Ashley, that’s a long story, but to make it simple: A lot of voters I spoke to said there’s a real need for facilities improvements, and that Oakland students deserve this bond money. Fremont High is a great example of how transformative bond money can be. But also, people have concerns about giving this OUSD board more bond money. And Oakland voters have every reason to be skeptical. 

AM: You’re talking about the 2019 Grand Jury report that accused the district of mismanaging bond money.

TD: Yeah. However, the Grand Jury report also made some helpful recommendations that the district is acting on. And maybe more importantly, Oakland voters have an opportunity this year to elect a brand new school board majority. 

AM: However the school board election shakes out, Oaklanders will still need to pay attention to how the money gets spent, and hold the board accountable to make sure that they get what they voted for.

TD: If Measure Y passes, that’s true.

AM: Thanks Tony.

Howard Dyckoff: Hi, I’m Howard D., a correspondent with Oakland Voices. We hope you’ve found this video informative. If you’d like to learn more about voting and this year’s local races, you can find more Oakland election coverage at oaklandside.org and at oaklandvoices.us. And remember, election day is November 3rd.

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Tony Daquipa is a dad, bureaucrat, PTA Officer, photographer, hop farmer, collector of East Oakland rainwater, urban bicyclist, union thug, karaoke diva, grumpy old man, storyteller, and preserver of history.

Ashley McBride reports on education equity for The Oaklandside. She covered the 2019 Oakland Unified School District teachers’ strike as a breaking news reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. More recently, she was an education reporter for the San Antonio Express-News where she covered several local school districts, charter schools, and the community college system. McBride earned her master’s degree in journalism from Syracuse University, has held positions at the Palm Beach Post and the Poynter Institute, and is a recent Hearst Journalism Fellow.

Lauren Janelle Richardson, an East Oakland resident and founder of BypassTV, is a multi-tiered media producer who specializes in capturing stories through video, photography, journalism, and audio productions. She also is a legal apprentice, studying under an attorney, in preparation to take the CA State Bar.

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