Articles by Jian Di Liang (Charlotte)

Jian Di Liang

About Jian Di Liang
Jian Di Liang (Charlotte) is from China. She is enthusiastic, friendly and outgoing. Meeting new people and traveling are her biggest interests.

The English Center

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By Jian Di Liang Being in the United States for two and a half years, my happiest time was the period studying at the English Center – a non-profit organization that helps new immigrants, refugees, and international students improve English skills and find jobs. To me, the Center was like a small society. I met […]

Happy New Year! Oakland’s Chinatown Welcomes The Year of the Snake

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By Jian Di Liang The Lunar New Year is coming, and so is The Year of the Snake. The New Year is one of the most important festivals in Chinese culture. The Street Festival held on the 2nd and 3rd of February in Oakland’s Chinatown attracted many people to consume and prepare for their celebration. […]

Freedom?!

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By Jian Di Liang My friend Alice came to the US in May last year. And we met each other at the English Center –  a non-profit organization that helps immigrants, refugees and international students improve English skills and find jobs. We graduated and went our separate ways, only to be reunited earlier this year […]

Dimond’s Food Mill

Food Mill has been selling natural and nutritional food since 1933.

By Jian Di Liang “Our store is family-oriented, and we are dedicated to help customers and serve  the best food,” says Kirk Watkins, owner of The Food Mill in Upper Dimond. “We have been here for 80 years and I would like the store to stay old fashioned while everyone else is moving on. ” […]

“Take It or Leave It”

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When Chinese parents come to the US, they often sacrifice themselves for their children. Often, they can’t take the time to sit and study English because they are working several jobs to provide better lives for their kids. You would think that, as a society, everyone would respect that kind of hard work. It’s part of American values, isn’t it?

Moon Cakes, Mid-Autumn, and Losing My Chinese-ness

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I have begun to understand why a lot of American-born Chinese people do not feel connected to their Chinese ethnicity. If their families are like mine – working a lot, with no time to practice their Chinese traditions at home – then the culture might not get passed on to the next generations. Besides, traditional festivals mean nothing to us if our parents are not able to celebrate them with us.

Just How Chinese is Oakland’s Chinatown?

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Story and photos by Jian Di Liang In Oakland, Chinatown is considered an Asian center. The markets, restaurants, and social services draw people who are originally from China, Vietnam, Cambodia and other Asian countries. The buildings at Chinatown are no longer just Chinese style, but mixed Western style as well. For many new Chinese immigrants living in […]